Print

Vitamin D and Breast Cancer Prevention

More than one million cases of breast cancer are reported worldwide every year. A number of studies have revealed that women most deficient of vitamin D have the highest risk of breast cancer. Scientists suggest that vitamin D promotes programmed cell death in tumor cells.

 

A recent research conducted by INSERM, France, gave clear evidence that vitamin D is vital in reducing the risk of breast cancer, and additional exposure to the sun reduces this risk even more. The researchers tracked about 67,000 postmenopausal women for 10 years to observe the development of breast cancer.

 

They saw that the women who lived in sunny regions and took adequate dietary vitamin D had 41% lower risk of breast cancer than the ones who didn’t get enough of sunshine. Even the females who got lots of sun exposure but took lower dietary vitamin D were found to have 33% lower risk than those living in less sunny regions. In fact, the women who took food rich in vitamin D and also got lots of sun exposure were most protected from breast cancer.

 

Based on this research the French scientists concluded that a minimum amount of vitamin D intake is necessary through both the sources- food as well as exposure to the sun, in order to prevent the risk of breast cancer.

 

It was all about the onset of breast cancer. Another study was conducted by a group of scientists at James P. Wilmot Cancer Center on the progression of breast cancer and level of vitamin D in the body. They examined 155 women who had undergone breast cancer surgery, and collected data regarding their blood tests, age, and menopause status, stage of breast cancer, hormone levels and gene expression.

 

Scientists then divided the results into two groups on the basis of their vitamin D concentration – women with optimal levels of vitamin D (32 mg/ml or more) and women with suboptimal level (32 mg/ml or less)

 

It demonstrated that the most severe forms of breast cancer, triple-negative tumors (it doesn’t even respond to hormonal treatments), were related to sub-optimal vitamin D levels.

 

Researchers also found that the vitamin D levels in the blood kept falling as symptoms of breast cancer worsened. This research was published in the Annals of Surgical Oncology.

Login

Register

*
*
*
*
*
*

Fields marked with an asterisk (*) are required.